Google Asindu Nine - A Phoenix From The Ashes
  1. 
Flame Atronachs are a breed of Daedra that prefer ranged magic to physical combat. Constructed entirely of fire, Flame Atronachs resemble humanoid females wearing black metal armor. They possess horns, pointed ears, three fingers, and two toes. Flame Atronachs float above the ground at all times and when moving they leave a trail of fire behind. When idle they often do spins and back flips. Unlike other Atronachs, Flame Atronachs rely on speed, agility, and powerful ranged attacks to dispatch their foes.
    Flame Atronachs are a breed of Daedra that prefer ranged magic to physical combat. Constructed entirely of fire, Flame Atronachs resemble humanoid females wearing black metal armor. They possess horns, pointed ears, three fingers, and two toes. Flame Atronachs float above the ground at all times and when moving they leave a trail of fire behind. When idle they often do spins and back flips. Unlike other Atronachs, Flame Atronachs rely on speed, agility, and powerful ranged attacks to dispatch their foes.

    (Source: mirilawsons, via thisgirlgames)

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    4,506 notes
    Feb 22 3:33AM
  2. Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs
Pyramid from base to peak is lowest to highest.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow’s_hierarchy_of_needs

    Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs

    Pyramid from base to peak is lowest to highest.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow’s_hierarchy_of_needs

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    14 notes
  3. artruby:

Njideka Akunyili, “The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born” Might Not Hold True For Much Longer, (2013) on view at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

    artruby:

    Njideka Akunyili, “The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born” Might Not Hold True For Much Longer, (2013) on view at the Marianne Boesky Gallery

    (via amiyak)

    photo

    743 notes
    Jan 20 7:26AM
  4. prostheticknowledge:

    Face Substitution

    Creative coding in-browser experiment by Audun Mathias Øygard uses facial recognition to mask a face in webcam feed in realtime using a javascript library:

    This is a demo of face substitution using the javascript library clmtrackr. Keep your face still until the facemodel has fitted and try out different masks from the dropdown.

    Note that the face substitution works best with good, even lighting. The demo also needs support for WebGL, and works best in Google Chrome.

    The demo was inspired by Kyle McDonald & Arturo Castro’s face substitution, and includes bits from a computer vision library by wellflat for blending the faces.

    You can try this demo out for yourself here

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    1,606 notes
    Jan 11 3:36PM
  5. Body Heat Maps Varying with Emotion.

    photo

    Jan 06 4:41PM

    Tagged

    science
  6. photo

    30,078 notes
    Jan 06 4:24PM
  7. The distinction of ‘having work’ or not will change very soon as ‘work’ in its traditional sense will be increasingly hard to come by in the near future; technology is rapidly automating every single job that has any machine-like component.

    quote

    59 notes
    Jan 04 9:45AM
  8. futuramb:

new-aesthetic:

A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it? « The Jury Room

We’ve written as lot about “brain malfunction” [aka “did my brain make me do it?”] defenses here but this is a new twist on the neurolaw question. Deep brain stimulation (“DBS”) is a well-accepted treatment for a number of serious and treatment resistant neurological conditions from Parkinson’s Disease to depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. As effective as DBS can be, there are also concerns about how, in some patients, it changes one’s personality to cause “undesirable or even deviant behavior”. The behavioral/personality changes depend on the location of the deep brain stimulation (and the functions carried out by that portion of the brain). 
So. You have a condition for which everyday treatment is ineffective or causes side-effects worse than the condition itself. Your doctor suggests a brain implant to offer deep brain stimulation (DBS). You are unfortunately, one of those for whom DBS creates behavioral reactions and you do something illegal. Are you responsible? Or is it your brain implant? […]
The article is very complex and the ideas in it are provocative. We cannot do justice to the questions raised by these writers in a brief blog post. It’s a very serious question.
"When you agree to a cutting-edge treatment and you are informed that for some people, behavioral changes may occur, do you thereby accept responsibility for any actions you take under the influence of that treatment?
"Or, since the behavior is completely different than anything you have previously displayed  and is thus believed due to the treatment (which can be shut off) is it fair to deny responsibility?
"And if you encounter aberrant behavioral effects but decide to not shut off the DBS because you appreciate the ways in which it helps you function, are you then more responsible for any illegal act you committed since you are choosing to continue down the same path?"
Yes. This is a new question. Not, “did my brain make me do it?” but “did my brain implant make me do it?”. Ultimately, however, the larger question remains the same. Where does our personal responsibility end?


A slightly newer twist but I agree that it is the same problem of individual responsibility which is deconstructed into it’s functional components.

    futuramb:

    new-aesthetic:

    A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it? « The Jury Room

    We’ve written as lot about “brain malfunction” [aka “did my brain make me do it?”] defenses here but this is a new twist on the neurolaw question. Deep brain stimulation (“DBS”) is a well-accepted treatment for a number of serious and treatment resistant neurological conditions from Parkinson’s Disease to depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. As effective as DBS can be, there are also concerns about how, in some patients, it changes one’s personality to cause “undesirable or even deviant behavior”. The behavioral/personality changes depend on the location of the deep brain stimulation (and the functions carried out by that portion of the brain). 

    So. You have a condition for which everyday treatment is ineffective or causes side-effects worse than the condition itself. Your doctor suggests a brain implant to offer deep brain stimulation (DBS). You are unfortunately, one of those for whom DBS creates behavioral reactions and you do something illegal. Are you responsible? Or is it your brain implant? […]

    The article is very complex and the ideas in it are provocative. We cannot do justice to the questions raised by these writers in a brief blog post. It’s a very serious question.

    "When you agree to a cutting-edge treatment and you are informed that for some people, behavioral changes may occur, do you thereby accept responsibility for any actions you take under the influence of that treatment?

    "Or, since the behavior is completely different than anything you have previously displayed  and is thus believed due to the treatment (which can be shut off) is it fair to deny responsibility?

    "And if you encounter aberrant behavioral effects but decide to not shut off the DBS because you appreciate the ways in which it helps you function, are you then more responsible for any illegal act you committed since you are choosing to continue down the same path?"

    Yes. This is a new question. Not, “did my brain make me do it?” but “did my brain implant make me do it?”. Ultimately, however, the larger question remains the same. Where does our personal responsibility end?

    A slightly newer twist but I agree that it is the same problem of individual responsibility which is deconstructed into it’s functional components.

    photo

    329 notes
    Jan 04 6:54AM
  9. designersofthings:

Forrester Sees 2014 As An Intelligent, Wearable & Highly Fragmented Year 
The internet is a buzz with predictions for next year as we get ready to say goodbye to 2013. Among the crystal-ball gazing is a list of six computing meta-trends from independent tech and market research company Forrester.
Forrester’s computing trends are in context to what they call “The Age of the Consumer”, a period where being customer-oriented is key to gaining marketshare. 
We’ve summarized the six meta-trends here but highly suggest you head on over to the original post written by Forrester VP JP Grownder on the Forrester blog.
Customers will no longer accept brand experiences that do not have  contextual experiences available on any device they are using including mobile and tablets.
Operating systems will continue to be as fragmented as 2013 but despite companies vying for consumer stickiness, users won’t be loyal.
We will see many wearables reach their commercial release next year along with some big players entering the market.
Digital assistants like Google Now and Siri become more useable and more useful and start to change how we interact with devices
Gesture-control will become the new use case for computing with the proliferation of many hardware options and applications from developers.
2014 is the year when we will start to walk into a store and it will know you and customize your shopping experience to make it more relevant (Channel).
Source: Forrester

    designersofthings:

    Forrester Sees 2014 As An Intelligent, Wearable & Highly Fragmented Year 

    The internet is a buzz with predictions for next year as we get ready to say goodbye to 2013. Among the crystal-ball gazing is a list of six computing meta-trends from independent tech and market research company Forrester.

    Forrester’s computing trends are in context to what they call “The Age of the Consumer”, a period where being customer-oriented is key to gaining marketshare. 

    We’ve summarized the six meta-trends here but highly suggest you head on over to the original post written by Forrester VP JP Grownder on the Forrester blog.

    1. Customers will no longer accept brand experiences that do not have  contextual experiences available on any device they are using including mobile and tablets.
    2. Operating systems will continue to be as fragmented as 2013 but despite companies vying for consumer stickiness, users won’t be loyal.
    3. We will see many wearables reach their commercial release next year along with some big players entering the market.
    4. Digital assistants like Google Now and Siri become more useable and more useful and start to change how we interact with devices
    5. Gesture-control will become the new use case for computing with the proliferation of many hardware options and applications from developers.
    6. 2014 is the year when we will start to walk into a store and it will know you and customize your shopping experience to make it more relevant (Channel).

    Source: Forrester

    (via futuramb)

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    191 notes
    Jan 03 5:23AM
  10. » A Mind-Controlled Exoskeleton Will Kick Off the 2014 World Cup

    singularitarian:

    image

    It won’t be a superstar football player who takes the first kick of 2014’s Football World Cup in Brazil. Nope, instead, it will be a teenager, paralysed from the waist down, who will use the world’s most advanced mind-controlled exoskeleton to get things underway.

    (via futurescope)

    link

    249 notes
    Jan 02 6:59PM
  11. youthedesigner:

    Interview with Australian artist CJ Hendry and her mind-blowing photorealistic drawings!

    photo

    14 notes
  12. Drew an Angry Bird…………

    Drew an Angry Bird…………

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  13. Greatest Optical illusion Ever!! 

    Greatest Optical illusion Ever!! 

    (Source: yimmyayo, via data-pusher)

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    1,032 notes
    Jan 01 10:32AM
  14. Gregoria’s World by Grant Snider.

    Gregoria’s World by Grant Snider.

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    Dec 29 5:58PM
  15. thecraftychemist:

3D printed working speaker

From the sound if it, it’s not a very good speaker. But then, that’s not quite the point. What’s particularly cool there is that a team of Cornell researchers created the whole thing using 3D printers — the plastic shell and conductive and magnetic pieces.
The speaker marks a step toward a larger utopian vision where entire products are fabricated using such techniques, not simply shells and other miscellany. That’s still a ways off, of course.
Aside from the clear (or no so clear) sound issues, there are some roadblocks. For one thing, there’s the fact that the job still required two separate printers for different components. Also, the speaker had to be hooked up to wires to play the audio clip of President Obama name-checking 3D printing.


Source

Video can be found here

    thecraftychemist:

    3D printed working speaker

    From the sound if it, it’s not a very good speaker. But then, that’s not quite the point. What’s particularly cool there is that a team of Cornell researchers created the whole thing using 3D printers — the plastic shell and conductive and magnetic pieces.

    The speaker marks a step toward a larger utopian vision where entire products are fabricated using such techniques, not simply shells and other miscellany. That’s still a ways off, of course.

    Aside from the clear (or no so clear) sound issues, there are some roadblocks. For one thing, there’s the fact that the job still required two separate printers for different components. Also, the speaker had to be hooked up to wires to play the audio clip of President Obama name-checking 3D printing.

    Video can be found here

    (via rollership)

    photo

    68 notes
    Dec 28 4:05AM